Photographs

Jekyll Island

(posted 11/28/22)

Here are some of my favorite photos from our Thanksgiving getaway to Jekyll Island, Georgia. The weather was cold and cloudy all week, but we made the best of it, taking in the scenery and touring some of the old cottages.

The Jekyll Island Clubhouse pictured here with some men playing croquet on the green. Designed and built in the 1880s by Chicago Architect Charles Alexander, it’s the most iconic building on the island.

Jekyll Island Clubhouse

This is one of the two cottages we toured. There were 16 unique cottages built by wealthy families on the island and 11 remain. Its name is Hollybourne and was the winter home of Charles Stewart Maurice, a civil engineer and bridge builder. The architecture incorporates bridge trusses and the exterior walls are made from tabby, a mixture of concrete, lime, sand, and shell.

A surprise to us was the abundance of seasonal decor and wonderful lighting done on the island – we were able to do the self guided Holly Jolly light tour with 7 of us packed into a golf cart. Sipping an Irish coffee in the middle of the tour was a necessary highlight.

This photo was taken from the pier where we boarded a boat to go dolphin watching. We did see several dolphins, and they came fairly close to the boat which was exciting.

Historic District Pier

Here’s one of several butterflies we saw one day walking on the shopping mall grounds on a warmer day. And the gopher tortoise’s shell had me in awe when we stopped in at a nature center.

Here’s the pristine beach on a partly sunny day. Unfortunately most days were too cold or windy to be on the beach but we were able to spend some time there.

Jekyll Island Beach Pavilion Park

I brought my Canon DSLR to take some photos at the eerie Driftwood Beach hoping to incorporate them into encaustic art in the coming months. I’ll leave you with some of my favorite photos from that beach in the rest of this post. Thanks for looking!

Moreland Meadow 2020

(posted 09/11/2022)

In spring of 2020, when society contracted and we eliminated in-person gatherings, I started a habit of walking each morning at dawn before work. My job in data analysis was sitting at a computer for eight hours or more, so the walks really helped me mentally and physically feel energized each day. In every direction from my house there is beautiful scenery, since I’m lucky to live in a rural community. My route quickly became ingrained down a side gravel road with overhanging tree limbs that provided some pretty canopies as I approached.

What I loved most was catching glimpses of creatures I don’t usually see or hear. An occasional car would drive by, but often times it was just me on the road with busy birds, camouflaged rabbits, and the occasional running deer. One day I found this young orange newt crossing the road and so I helped him to the other side.

I vaguely remember watching for a solar eclipse over the tops of the trees once. I sometimes would see a cat crouched by the side of the meadow on his early morning hunt.

Early last year, I was devastated when tree cutting services swept down the road and cut many of the beautiful trees lining each side. On one walk, a little bird became very aggressive with me, swooping over my head several times. I can’t help but wonder if it thought I was what took down those trees. This year, some homes were built on the meadows of Moreland Road where I often stopped to snap photos of wildflowers, sunrises, morning mist, and dewy spider webs. Now the gravel road is paved, and I stopped the walks.

I am fairly certain the lot where my current home is was once a meadow or forest. I am not guilt-free of this encroachment on nature, but it has been very sad to experience the loss. What I do still have though are many photos I took on my strolls in 2020. Here are a few.

I made several encaustic art pieces from them and have sold a few. The ones in frames are my favorites, and I don’t plan to sell them. As I look at these and enjoy the beauty of the photos and the memories they hold, I can’t help but be grateful for this silver lining to the cloud that came over us in 2020.